DMCii grants Catapult open access to its 2010 World Archive



 The Satellite Applications Catapult, an independent technology and innovation company, and Disaster Monitoring Constellation International Imaging (DMCii), have recently signed a collaboration agreement to enable the UK community to access and use their 2010 world archives, free of charge, for full commercial use as well as research and development.
DMCii, which is owned by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd, provides a unique Earth observation (EO) satellite constellation that delivers high frequency imaging of any part of the world’s surface. Each satellite is owned by an international organisation, used for commercial purposes or as part of a national programme. However, when activated as part of the Disaster Monitoring Constellation (DMC), DMCii provides free satellite imagery for international disasters or humanitarian aid support.
 
Stuart Martin, CEO of the Satellite Applications Catapult said, “We are very excited about this agreement with DMCii which will see over 300GB of 22m resolution data being made freely available for the benefit of the UK community. Significantly, this data can be used for commercial and R&D activities. The data covers mainly UK, France and Africa, and will be made available via the Catapult’s Climate, Environment and Monitoring from Space (CEMS) platform.”
 
Dave Hodgson, CEO of DMCii added, “The DMC satellite imagery archive is extensive. For over 10 years our imagery has generated public environmental information and forged new business opportunities in markets including agriculture, forestry and mapping.”
 
Hodgson continued, “As the UK’s first commercial EO satellite operator, DMCii is delighted to be working with the Catapult and providing our imagery to be used by researchers and commercial entities, to help stimulate the next generation of satellite applications that inform and protect our people and planet.”
 
Further information will be provided on the access to this data once all the data is in place.

Cookies on Catapult explained

To comply with EU directives we now provide detailed information about the cookies we use. To find out more about cookies on this site, what they do and how to remove them, see our information about cookies. Click OK to continue using this site.

OK